Kids Eat Right? Pretty Cheesy.

The ship has long since sailed where I post things here in a timely fashion, so I’m just going to run with it and publish this post I started writing about the whole Kraft Singles & Kids Eat Right nutrition seal of approval because it’s basically the most ridiculous thing ever.

To quickly fill you in, last week The New York Times reported a big first in nutrition: the first “Kids Eat Right” seal of approval so to speak. A logo that would appear on food products, supposedly indicating that it’s a healthy choice for parents to feed their kids. How cool, right?! Anything to make feeding our kids healthy foods easier and less confusing.

WRONG.

This is the first product this logo will appear on:

kraft singles kids eat right

No, I didn’t accidently post the wrong photo. You’re seeing correctly; it’s a picture of Kraft Cheese singles. The same product that my married-to-a-dietitian-though-he-tries-his-best-to-fight-my-knowledge husband knows is called cheese product because there’s not enough cheese in it to legally call it cheese.

Enter mass confusion here.

While the Academy of Nutrition & Dietetics {the main overseeing organization of nutrition professionals, etc.} says this is not a seal of approval, by all sakes of appearances, it sure seems to send that message. Decide for yourself.

kids eat right seal

If I didn’t know any better, I’d assume this logo meant it was good choice for me and my kid. Oy vey.

There’s a big fuss because AND is saying that it’s not an endorsement or recommendation, but Kraft is saying it is, and basically there’s clearly some kind of exchange of money or support or advertising at play here. AND doesn’t have a huge backbone to stand on regardless of the actual facts of this precise situation, given that they openly utilize sponsors like Coke and McDonald’s. {This is where I point out that though I’m a registered dietitian I have long since left the membership ranks of AND because of such discrepancies and confusing overriding messages.}

Luckily there’s enough people standing up to this ridiculous nonsense that voices may actually be heard, though we’ll see to what extent. If you want to share your view or simply learn more, check these out:

repeal the seal for kids eat right

#RepealtheSeal – a change.org petition against the Kids Eat Right seal being used on such products, created by registered dietitians

Dietitians for Professional Integrity – keeping you informed on the true happenings with this scenario and others of the like. I love their Facebook page for staying up to date.